Tag Archives: book reviews

Manga Monday: A Girl on the Shore (Umibe no Onnanoko #1-2) by Inio Asano

Vertical Comics
Published Jan. 19, 2016
408 Pages

When Koume and Keisuke’s relationship begins to take shape, it is apparent that they are both searching for something. Maybe Keisuke wants something more than a kiss from the fair Koume. Maybe Koume is looking for someone better than Misaki, the local playboy. But what they find in each other over the course of a summer might be far greater than anything they were expecting.

Their lives are going to change. And this will all transpire before high school exams!- Goodreads

I didn’t particularly enjoy this manga and I believe a lot of this has to do with not understanding where the author was going with this.

Firstly, if you are uncomfortable with sexual themes and images, you will not enjoy this book in the least. Secondly, although the manga starts off with a very obvious storyline, it jumps a tangent and generally becomes confusing.

Koume and Keisuke are young kids and they have a very weird relationship. There is obviously abuse within their relationship and they are both using each other but for what, it isn’t really defined. The cycle keeps going for a while and it becomes really disturbing. When you do see some kind of truth, it is hard to put two and two together.

This was frustrating and even at the end, I was even more frustrated because there didn’t appear to be any reason behind it any of the actions. What I mean is the bigger picture was just not there for me.

But I finished the book because the characters were interested. I wanted to know more about Koume and Keisuke, specifically I wanted to know more about what made them tick and a bit about their past. Granted they are young and there may not be a long winded history but something like that would have made the story less confusing and gave it a kick.

In regards to illustration, it was drawn very well, detailed and you can see the care in the artwork.

Overall, I would have to give this series

2 Pickles  

2 because initially I enjoyed the story, was looking for progress and I finished it.

Book Review: Great Discoveries and Inventions by African-Americans Fourth Edition by David M. Foy

I love history and I love expanding knowledge. I always read what is recommended to me and Discover Black advised that I read this book and I was surprised.

  Duncan & Duncan  Published March 1, 2008             146 Pages
Duncan & Duncan
Published March 1, 2008
146 Pages

Simply put this book is a reference book that details what African Americans have done historically in this world. This is not your common Martin Luther King, Madame C J Walker, or Nat Turner reference book; this book is pages on top of pages of African Americans who are not commonly known to average citizen. This is what I really appreciated about this book. It told information that I didn’t know.

For instance, have you ever heard of Frederick McKinley Jones (1892-1961)? Did you know he invented 16 items that are used today such as the ticket dispensing machine but most importantly the air conditioning unit? Who off the street would know that information?

What I also love about this book is most of all is it makes reference to the fact that these inventions/discoveries are still used today when they were found/created over 70 years ago. The relevance is important in any and all reference books and I believe this book did a really good job of it.

My only qualms about this book . . .  the pictures weren’t in color. LOL

Overall this book (yes it will be rated even though it is a reference book) gets a 9 out of 10. It was extremely informative. Perfect for research papers or just a expansion of knowledge. It wasn’t long and dragged out; it got to the point and provided patent numbers with dates. Book is completely filled with knowledge.

Book Review: A Midsummer Night’s Scream by R.L. Stine

Ummm let’s just say this isn’t what I expected from the master of horror.

       Feiwel & Friends    Published July 2, 2013                250 Pages
Feiwel & Friends
Published July 2, 2013
250 Pages

Claire has the perfect life; her family owns a movie company (although on the brink of bankruptcy) and she has an amazing best friend Delia (who is the perfect image). The only snag in Claire world is Jake, the boy she is in love with loves Delia and Delia loves Shawn (Jake’s best friend) who is in love with Claire.

Although Claire and Delia are trying to get the attention of their boys of choice they are also trying to launch their movie career by staring in the remake of Mayhem Manor. Mayhem Manor is a haunted house in which three teenagers making a movie died accidently. Claire’s family owned movie company is trying to remake it when you guessed it accidents begin to happen and people begin to die.

This book had so much potential it was dripping from the pages. But R.L. Stine dropped the ball big time. This book was nothing I would ever recommend. There was no personal struggle. All Claire cared about was getting the boy she liked to like her back; when things starting getting weird it affected none of the teenagers. A costar died and you’re going to the cheesecake factory -.- or you’re making corny jokes after you beat the bad guy.

The book was cheesy and it was poorly written. You cling on and keep reading because it’s R.L. Stine and you’re hoping for the big horror of the book. But the biggest horror was how the crappy the characters were and their lack of substance.

The only good thing about the book was the idea itself, not the Shakespeare part because it was really unnecessary.  The idea of a movie company remaking a movie in which real deaths take place in a haunted mansion was pretty cool.

Overall, the book gets 4 out of 5. Sorry Mr. Stine but you fell short on this one big time. Also i really really think the Shakespeare aspect was completely completely unecessary.

 

Tania Lasenburg is a communications major that plays video games and cyber stalks Gym Class Heroes. Follow her on twitter @mrztanyapickles